35 uses for baling twine at the barn


This bridle shows an innovative use of baling twine.

This bridle shows an innovative use of baling twine.

Baling twine is right up there with duct tape as being one of those “can’t live without” items. The best part is that you always seem to have more of it than you can possibly imagine and it’s included in the price of your hay!

I’m not sure I can come up with 101 uses, but it will come close! Here’s what I’ve used it for:

  • Lead rope
  • Cross ties
  • Blanket straps
  • Bit keeper for full cheek snaffle
  • Side reins
  • To hold a stall door open
  • Braided and used as a stall guard
  • Dog leash
  • Standing martingale
  • A grab strap
  • Laces for my boots
  • Fix a broken halter
  • To tie a gate shut
  • Temporary fencing
  • Overcheck to prevent grazing
  • To tie the scissors to the wall so they won’t get lost
  • Belt for my chaps
  • Headband or hair tie
  • To tie up water and feed buckets
  • Braided together as a balance rein

And here are some of the innovative uses that I found on horse forums.

  • Curb strap
  • Braided together as a muck bucket strap
  • Home made hay nets
  • Replacing broken ends of lunge whips
  • Spur straps
  • Reins
  • Grazing reins
  • Rope halter
  • Crocheted or braided into a rug
  • Tie plants to trellis
  • Grooming whisk
  • Bucket scrubber
  • Handles for the end of electric fencing
  • Hammocks!
  • Art!!

Seriously, the baling twine as art is pretty cool. Check these out:

Baling twine as art as shown at the Kyneton Agricultural Show in Australia.

Baling twine as art as shown at the Kyneton Agricultural Show in Australia.

More uses for baling twine.

More artistic interpretations of baling twine.

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6 responses

  1. So Agree!! Baling twine is far underrated! I’ve got a million and one uses for the blue/orange/yellow twine. I love the twine art! Very cool.

  2. I have used baling twine to tie the wheel of my wheel barrow back on when the bolts fell out. It’s holding up great! But I never thought of it as art. Very clever. Now I want to knit a baling twine hat with a big floppy brim.

  3. Glad you posted this – I knew there was a reason I was collecting it! I used some the other day to steady a broken support that the chickens use as a ladder to get to their roost. Handy stuff.

    And I love the idea of dying it and making stuff out of it. Great photos.

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