Unusual horse art to say the least!


People standing in the shape of a horse
What an amazing image! 650 officers and enlisted men of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 326, a Cavalry unit, created this human representation of a horse head.
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18 thoughts on “Unusual horse art to say the least!

      1. All I want is to have a print of this BEAUTIFUL PICTURE.., I rode Hunter and Jumpers when Younger and I Love my HORSES!! Any chance of purchasing one?? Sincerely, Carol Spratt

      1. I’m one of those People who only knows enough to get in trouble.. Please tell me step by step how to do That, please.
        Sincerely, Carol Spratt

  1. 650 Officers and Enlisted Men of
    Auxiliary Remount Depot, Camp 326, Camp Cody, NM
    Symbol of Head Pose of “The Devil”, Saddle Horse Ridden By Maj. Frank G. Brewer, Remount Commander
    Photo by Mark Raen

    1. The Keokuk County Historical Society in Sigourney, Iowa, has one of these pictures in our museum. Lee Hollingsworth of Ollie, Iowa, was in the picture. He entered service on Sept. 21, 1917, and reported to Camp Dodge, Iowa. We also know that he was sationed at Camp Cody. Thus, the date would need to be late 1917 or there-after. We have no other information but were glad to see it on the web-site. June Rice

      1. Thanks! I love it when readers can chime in and help give context to the photos.

    1. The best information that I can find on the photo is this. Since the image was taken before 1923, it is in the public domain so it should be possible for you to use it along with credit to the photographer.

      Calvary Unit in Camp Cody, NM posed to represent the head of the saddle horse of commander Frank G. Brewer. It was a tribute to horses, donkeys and mules that died during the war.

      In the caption at the bottom it reads
      “650 Officers and Enlisted Men of Auxiliary Remount Depot , Camp 326, Camp Cody , NM
      Symbol of Head Pose of “The Devil,” Saddle Horse Ridden By Maj. Frank G. Brewer, Remount Commander”

      Research dates the photo to around 1917.

      Photo credit: Mark Raen

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