Chicken feed doesn’t cut it

This doesn't look much like alfalfa pellets
This doesn’t look much like alfalfa pellets.

As I mentioned in my post yesterday, I’m tired. In fact, I was tired before going hunting. It has something to do with the beginning of high school and the necessity of waking up at 6:15 to make sure my daughter arrives at school on time. I am much more chipper if I can sleep until 7 a.m.

I’ve also been working a lot. Like many self-employed people, work is something that you embrace when it’s available and clients never spread the wealth of projects over the entire year; they jam them all into a few months.

So what does this have to do with horses? When I’m tired, I make mistakes.

Last week we had a delivery of hay. I was expecting a few bags of grain and was pleased to see my flax seed, some bags of Triple Crown and two brown bags. I’d ordered the grain, the flax seed and alfalfa pellets so that seemed about right.

I moved them down to my tack room and decided that since I had a few minutes, I’d fill up my container of alfalfa pellets. The brown bags weren’t my usual brand but the feed store doesn’t always have the same kind.  I pulled the string off the top of the bag, dumped the contents into a Rubber Maid container, then gasped. What I’d just dumped into my remaining alfalfa pellets looked suspiciously like chicken feed. Which, in fact, it was! My barn-mate has chickens at home and these were for her, not for me.

Realizing the error of my ways I spent the next 10 minutes trying to separate the chicken feed from the alfalfa, which was easier said than done. In the end, I figured what was left wouldn’t hurt Freedom, but I’m sure he wondered why his feed tasted so strange.

3 thoughts on “Chicken feed doesn’t cut it

  1. Please don’t feed the chicken feed to your horse. Chickens aren’t as sensitive to blue mold so if a feed mill finds blue mold in their corn, they set it aside for the chickens. IF the feed has blue mold in it, it can seriously hurt your horse.

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