Another reason to wear gloves at the barn

hand after bee sting
Right after the sting, the area around the stinger started to swell. But I was lucky. Today my hand is only moderately swollen.

In the fall, I worry about ground bees. We frequently stir them up when out hunting and they can cause chaos (when they sting the horses) and pain (when they sting humans).

One of the last times that I was stung, just once on the wrist, I awoke the next morning to find my arm was swollen from my fingers to my elbow and my fingers wouldn’t bend enough to hold a pen.

When I ride, I carry Benedryl and an Epi-pen, in case my allergy is getting worse as I age.

For all my precautions out riding, I neglected to take the most rudimentary one yesterday at the barn. I was not wearing work gloves when I was cleaning the pasture. So, when I grabbed the handle of the pitchfork, not seeing the yellow jacket that was crawling there, I got stung but good, right in the webbing between my thumb and index finger of my left hand.

It is stunning how much a single sting can hurt. It is like getting stabbed repeatedly.

I had Benedryl on hand so I took some and then ran cold water over my hand. Immediately it started to swell and the combination of pain and itching was intense.

As soon as I got home I put on a paste of baking soda and water. That minimized the pain. Ice minimized the itching.

This morning my hand is still swollen but not like the last time.

I will tell you one thing: I am going to wear my work gloves religiously from now on!

 

4 thoughts on “Another reason to wear gloves at the barn

  1. I carry a small container of plain ammonia with me. It smells, but immediately neutralizes most venoms (bees, wasps, fire ants…I’ve even used it on black widow spider bites). Just dribble some on the entry spot and rub in. It will initially sting a little, but then it stops hurting. Works like a charm. Obviously, don’t do this around the eyes and don’t drink it . I’m horribly allergic to wasps…

Leave a Reply